Cockrell School of Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin


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Graduate Seminar - Dr. Seyyed Hosseini

Date

Monday, November 02, 2015

Time

03:00pm - 04:00pm

Location

CPE 2.204

Description

 

Seminar title:

“Monitoring CO2 Geological Injection: from research to commercial applications”

 

Abstract from the speaker:

The Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC), and industrial associates group within UT’s Bureau of Economic Geology, is leading research to scientifically support a proactive response to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Our main focus is to, through applied research, develop effective technologies and strategies to monitor geologic retention of CO2 in carbon storage projects. During the past 13 years, we have conducted several major field projects, including pilot projects such as Frio I and 2, and SECARB’s Cranfield. Currently, we are applying our learnings from these research intense projects to a couple of commercial enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, and transitioning from testing hypotheses and performance to confirming predictions and acquiring confidence.

During my talk, I will give an overview of our flagship projects and go over couple of techniques we use for monitoring of CO2-EOR fields in Gulf Coast.

 

Bio:

Dr. Seyyed A. Hosseini is a Research Associate at the Gulf Coast Carbon Center of the University of Texas at Austin’s Bureau of Economic Geology. In this position, he serves as Principal Investigator and co- Principal Investigator for several applied CCS projects.

He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Universidad of Isfahan, an M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the Sharif University of Technology and a PhD in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Tulsa. Before joining the Bureau of Economic Geology, Dr. Hosseini was a Senior Reservoir Simulation Engineer at Kelkar and Associates and postdoctoral fellow at Texas A&M University. Dr. Hosseini’s area of research is multiphase fluid flow in conventional and unconventional rocks.