Cockrell School of Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin


Hugh Daigle

Photo of Daigle, Hugh

Assistant Professor

Email: daigle@austin.utexas.edu
Phone: (512) 471-3775
Office: CPE 5.174

Personal Website: http://faculty.engr.utexas.edu/daigle/

Research Areas: Drilling, Well Completions, and Rock Mechanics; Fundamental Processes; Integrated Reservoir Characterization; Unconventional Resources; Nanoparticle Engineering for Subsurface Processes

Educational Qualifications:

AB, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 2004

PhD, Earth Science, Rice University, 2011

PGE Course:

PGE 373L (Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Design) 

PGE 381L (Advanced Petrophysics)

Research:

My research focuses on characterizing physical and transport properties of rocks using a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. Specific areas of interest include characterization of fluids and pore systems using nuclear magnetic resonance; fundamental research on magnetic resonance properties of nanoparticles; micropore characterization using BET measurements; evolution of petrophysical properties during consolidation of marine sediments; and numerical modeling of development and persistence of methane hydrates in marine sediments.

Awards & Honors:

UT PGE Outstanding Faculty Member Award, 2015

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation Centennial Fellowship #2, 2015

SPE Regional Formation Evaluation Award, 2014

Leroy Caleb Gibbon Award (best-conceived and best-written thesis submitted within 6 weeks of the oral defense), Rice University Department of Earth Science, 2011

National Energy Technology Laboratory Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship, 2009-2011

Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Rice University Department of Earth Science, 2010

Outstanding Student Paper Award, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 2008

Highlighted Publications and Google Scholar Profile:

Daigle, H., 2016. Relative permeability to water or gas in the presence of hydrates in porous media from critical path analysis. Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.petrol.2016.07.011.

Nole, M., Daigle, H., Milliken, K.L., Prodanović, M., 2016. A method for estimating microporosity of fine-grained sediments and sedimentary rocks via SEM image analysis. Sedimentology, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sed.12271.

Daigle, H., 2016. Application of critical path analysis for permeability prediction in natural porous media. Advances in Water Resources, 96, 43-54, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2016.06.016.

Zhu, C., Daigle, H., Bryant, S., 2016. Paramagnetic nanoparticles as nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents in sandstone: Importance of nanofluid-rock interactions. Interpretation, 4(2), SF23-SF33, http://dx.doi.org/10.1190/INT-2015-0137.1.

Daigle, H., Johnson, A., 2016. Combining mercury intrusion and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements using percolation theory. Transport in Porous Media, 111(3), 669-679, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11242-015-0619-1.

Daigle, H., Cook, A., Malinverno, A., 2015. Permeability and porosity of hydrate-bearing sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 68, 551-564, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2015.10.004.

Daigle, H., Ghanbarian, B., Henry, P., Conin, M., 2015. Universal scaling of the formation factor in clays: example from the Nankai Trough. Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth, 120(11), 7361-7375, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015JB012262.

Daigle, H., Screaton, E.J., 2015. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones. Geophysical Research Letters, 42(13), 5219-5226, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015GL064542.